International Bill of Gender Rights Is First Circulated Summary

  • Last updated on November 11, 2022

The International Bill of Gender Rights, a statement created to address and outline the rights of transgender people but applicable to all, regardless of gender expression or sexuality, is the first circulated document of its kind. The bill has yet to be adopted by any official governmental body, but it has been used as a guide for a number of governmental agencies around the world that have adopted similar civil rights bills.

Summary of Event

The International Bill of Gender Rights (IBGR) was adopted by the International Conference on Transgender Law and Employment Policy International Conference on Transgender Law and Employment Policy Transgender Law and Employment Policy, International Conference on (ICTLEP) on June 17, 1995, in Houston, Texas. The bill has no authoritative or legal effect as it has yet to be adopted by any legislative body such as the United Nations or by any country. The bill contains ten rights for all people, regardless of their claimed gender identity. [kw]International Bill of Gender Rights Is First Circulated (June 17, 1995) [kw]Gender Rights Is First Circulated, International Bill of (June 17, 1995) [kw]Rights Is First Circulated, International Bill of Gender (June 17, 1995) International Bill of Gender Rights (1995) Gender Rights, International Bill of (1995) Transgender advocacy [c]Transgender/transsexuality;June 17, 1995: International Bill of Gender Rights Is First Circulated[2430] [c]Civil rights;June 17, 1995: International Bill of Gender Rights Is First Circulated[2430] [c]Government and politics;June 17, 1995: International Bill of Gender Rights Is First Circulated[2430] [c]Organizations and institutions;June 17, 1995: International Bill of Gender Rights Is First Circulated[2430] Roberts, JoAnn Stuart, Sharon Frye, Phyllis Randolph

The text of the bill was written and edited by several people. A bill of gender rights was first written by JoAnn Roberts in 1991 and then circulated for community input. This first draft is considered the basis for the current IBGR that was developed and maintained by the ICTLEP. Roberts is a cofounder of the Renaissance Transgender Association, Inc., Renaissance Transgender Association the largest open-membership support organization for transgender people in the United States.

In 1991, attorney Sharon Stuart proposed a gender bill of rights in the newsletter of the International Foundation for Gender Education International Foundation for Gender Education Gender Education, International Foundation for (IFGE). While Roberts and Stuart approached the text of the bill differently, the underlying premises were sufficiently similar. Thus, Stuart was able to incorporate the ideas from both documents into the first draft of the existing bill, the International Bill of Gender Rights. Stuart’s draft was presented at the second annual meeting of the ICTLEP in 1993. Those who worked extensively on the draft at that time include Susan Stryker, Jan Eaton, Martine Rothblatt, and Phyllis Randolph Frye. Transgender women

The ICTLEP was formed in 1992 by transgender activists and attorneys Stuart and Frye to convene law conferences for transgender lawyers and laypersons. The conferences provide a forum for the discussion of strategies for changing existing policy and creating new laws at community and national levels. Stuart has served as ICTLEP’s gender rights director and is a law librarian. Frye has been a trial attorney in private practice since 1981 and was an adjunct professor at the Thurgood Marshall Law School at Texas Southern University in Houston. Frye was awarded the Creating Change Community Services Award, along with “the transgender community,” from the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force in 1995, and the Virginia Prince Lifetime Contribution Award from the International Foundation for Gender Education in 1999.

Significance

The International Bill of Gender Rights has not been adopted in its totality by any country or any local government, and there is no federal U.S. law that protects transgender people from discrimination. However, several of the principles expressed in the document have been included in antidiscrimination laws in at least four states and fifty cities and counties in the United States. California, Minnesota, New Mexico, and Rhode Island protect transgender people from discrimination through state laws. Among the cities that have passed this legislation are Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, New York, Philadelphia, San Diego, and San Francisco, as well as the smaller municipalities of Covington, Kentucky; Huntington Woods, Michigan; Iowa City, Iowa; New Hope, Pennsylvania; and Peoria, Illinois.

In 2002, the New York city council adopted a law that protects the rights of transgender people in housing, employment, and public accommodations, but discrimination against transgender people has not ended in the city. Charges had been brought against the city’s Equal Employment Practices Commission, claiming that the commission failed to investigate a number of complaints of discrimination in housing and employment. Internationally, countries that have worked on legislation recognizing and protecting the rights of transgender people include Canada, South Africa, Australia, the United Kingdom, and other countries of western Europe. International Bill of Gender Rights (1995) Gender Rights, International Bill of (1995) Transgender advocacy

Further Reading
  • citation-type="booksimple"

    xlink:type="simple">Frye, Phyllis Randolph. “The International Bill of Gender Rights vs. the Cider House Rules: Transgenders Struggle with the Courts over What Clothing They Are Allowed to Wear on the Job, Which Restroom They Are Allowed to Use on the Job, Their Right to Marry, and the Very Definition of Their Sex.” William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law 7, no. 3 (2000).
  • citation-type="booksimple"

    xlink:type="simple">Gilbert, Michael, ed. International Journal of Transgenderism 4, no. 3 (July/September, 2000). Special issue, “What Is Transgender?” http://www.symposion.com/ijt/index.htm.
  • citation-type="booksimple"

    xlink:type="simple">Hunter, Nan D., Courtney G. Joslin, and Sharon M. McGowan. The Rights of Lesbians, Gay Men, Bisexuals, and Transgender People. 4th ed. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2004.
  • citation-type="booksimple"

    xlink:type="simple">Sharpe, Andrew N. Transgender Jurisprudence: Dysphoric Bodies of Law. London: Cavendish, 2002.
  • citation-type="booksimple"

    xlink:type="simple">Swan, Wallace K., ed. Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual/Transgender Public Policy Issues: A Citizen’s and Administrator’s Guide to the New Cultural Struggle. New York: Haworth Press, 1997.
  • citation-type="booksimple"

    xlink:type="simple">“When Is a Man a Man, and When Is a Woman a Woman?” Florida Law Review 52 (2000).
  • citation-type="booksimple"

    xlink:type="simple">Whittle, Stephen. Respect and Equality: Transsexual and Transgender Rights. Portland, Oreg.: Cavendish, 2002.

August 8, 1978: International Lesbian and Gay Association Is Founded

December 1, 1988: First World AIDS Day

1990: International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission Is Founded

1992: Transgender Nation Holds Its First Protest

September 16, 1994: U.N. Revokes Consultative Status of International Lesbian and Gay Association

November 20, 2003: Transgender Day of Remembrance and Remembering Our Dead Project

May 17, 2004: Transsexual Athletes Allowed to Compete in Olympic Games

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