• Last updated on November 11, 2022

The Supreme Court required women’s schools to admit male students.

Justice Sandra Day O’ConnorO’Connor, Sandra Day[OConnor, Sandra Day];Mississippi University for Women v. Hogan[Mississippi University for Women v. Hogan] wrote the decision her first on the Supreme Court for the 5-4 majority, upholding a young man’s claim that he was discriminated against by not being admitted to a women’s nursing school. Hogan, a young man who lived in Mississippi, claimed the state-supported school’s women-only policy violated his right to equal protection. O’Connor applied an intermediate standard of review, the test developed in Craig v. Boren[case]Craig v. Boren[Craig v. Boren] (1976), and found the state was not persuasive in saying it was trying to redress discrimination against women with its policy, for O’Connor could not see how this policy would help redress the grievances of women. She also ruled that the policy did not further the state’s objective because men were allowed to audit classes. Chief Justice Warren E. Burger and Justices Harry A. Blackmun, Lewis F. Powell, Jr., and William H. Rehnquist dissented.[case]Mississippi University for Women v. Hogan[Mississippi University for Women v. Hogan]Discrimination, sex;Mississippi University for Women v. Hogan[Mississippi University for Women v. Hogan]

Craig v. Boren

Edwards v. Aguillard

Equal protection clause

Gender issues

Judicial scrutiny

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