• Last updated on November 11, 2022

The Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

The Voting Rights Act of 1965Voting Rights Act of 1965 prescribed remedies for states that had practiced racial discrimination in voting. Under the act, South Carolina was prevented from enforcing literacy tests and property requirements for voting, and federal officials were appointed to oversee the registration of voters in the state and ensure that racial discrimination did not take place. By an 8-1 vote, the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the 1965 act, including the appointing of federal voting registrars in states with a record of discrimination against minorities in registering to vote. The decision was unanimous except for a partial dissent from Justice Hugo L. Black. Chief Justice Earl WarrenWarren, Earl;South Carolina v. Katzenbach[South Carolina v. Katzenbach] wrote the opinion for this landmark case, which became a benchmark in congressional enforcement of the Civil War Amendments by allowing Congress to proscribe a class of suspect practices without specifying in every case that the judiciary would hear evidence that the practices were unconstitutional.Vote, right to;South Carolina v. Katzenbach[South Carolina v. Katzenbach]

Due process, procedural

Elections

Equal protection clause

Fourteenth Amendment

Incorporation doctrine

Race and discrimination

Representation, fairness of

Vote, right to

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