Nuremberg Summary

  • Last updated on November 10, 2022

Between 1945 and 1946 trials were held for former Nazi Party leaders in Nuremberg, Germany. The international tribunal had been set up by the United States, Britain, France, and the Soviet Union to try former Nazis as war criminals. The types of crimes that were investigated were crimes against peace (i.e., conducting war in violation of treaties); crimes against humanity (deportation, extermination, genocide); and war crimes (violations of the laws of war, including murder and ill treatment of civilians). Twenty-two defendants were brought before the court over 216 court sessions; all but three were found guilty. Twelve were sentenced to death by hanging, three were sentenced to life in prison, and four were sentenced to prison terms of 10–20 years. The chief prosecutor for the United States was Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, and the principal judge for the United States was US Attorney General Francis Biddle. Nuremberg served as the model for the comparable international tribunal established to prosecute Japanese officials for war crimes.

Between 1945 and 1946 trials were held for former Nazi Party leaders in Nuremberg, Germany. The international tribunal had been set up by the United States, Britain, France, and the Soviet Union to try former Nazis as war criminals. The types of crimes that were investigated were crimes against peace (i.e., conducting war in violation of treaties); crimes against humanity (deportation, extermination, genocide); and war crimes (violations of the laws of war, including murder and ill treatment of civilians). Twenty-two defendants were brought before the court over 216 court sessions; all but three were found guilty. Twelve were sentenced to death by hanging, three were sentenced to life in prison, and four were sentenced to prison terms of 10–20 years. The chief prosecutor for the United States was Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, and the principal judge for the United States was US Attorney General Francis Biddle. Nuremberg served as the model for the comparable international tribunal established to prosecute Japanese officials for war crimes.

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