Oklahoma: Other Historic Sites Summary

  • Last updated on November 10, 2022

A list of important historic sites in Oklahoma.

Boley Historic District

Location: Boley, Okfuskee County

Relevant issues: African American history

Statement of significance: Begun as a camp for African American railroad construction hands, this is the largest of the towns established in Oklahoma to provide African Americans with the opportunity for self-government in an era of white supremacy and segregation.

Camp Nichols

Location: Wheeless, Cimarron County

Relevant issues: Western expansion

Statement of significance: This camp was established by Kit Carson in 1865 to offer protection to wagon trains using the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail.

Creek National Capitol

Location: 6th Street and Grand Avenue, Okmulgee, Okmulgee County

Relevant issues: American Indian history, political history

Statement of significance: This Victorian-style structure was used by the Creeks from 1878 to 1907, after their adoption of a representative form of government modeled on the United States Congress.

Fort Gibson

Location: Lee and Ash Streets, Fort Gibson, Muskogee County

Relevant issues: American Indian history, Civil War, military history

Statement of significance: Cherokee, Creek, and Seminole Indians removed from the Southeast by the government were brought here between 1824 and 1840. The fort was abandoned in 1857 and turned over to the Cherokee Nation. During the Civil War, it was reoccupied by federal forces consisting of three Cherokee Regiments, four companies of Kansas Cavalry, and Hopkins Battery. After the war, the post was garrisoned intermittently until it was abandoned as a military post in 1890 and reverted to the Cherokee Nation.

Fort Sill

Location: Fort Sill, Comanche County

Relevant issues: American Indian history, military history

Statement of significance: Troops stationed here were active in campaigns against Southern Plains tribes in the late 1800’s. Virtually all the original fort survives; it has expanded and continued to play a significant role for the Army in the twentieth century.

Fort Washita

Location: Nida, Bryan County

Relevant issues: American Indian history, western expansion

Statement of significance: This fort was established in 1842 (reportedly by Zachary Taylor) because of treaty commitments to the Chickasaws and Choctaws and to serve as a way station for travelers on the Southern Overland Trail.

Guthrie Historic District

Location: Bounded by Oklahoma Ave. on the north, Broad St. on the east, Harrison Ave. on the south, and railroad tracks on the west (includes 301 Harrison St.), Guthrie, Logan County

Relevant issues: Western expansion

Statement of significance: Comprising the commercial core of the city of Guthrie, the historic district contains mostly two- and three-story commercial buildings made of red brick and/or sandstone constructed between 1889 and 1910. This outstanding collection of late nineteenth and early twentieth century commercial architecture displays the aspirations of the city’s founders to create a city worthy of the distinction as the first and only territorial capital of Oklahoma (1890-1907) and then as the first state capital (1907-1910). Guthrie is also significant for its association with the opening of the last frontier to non-Indian settlement and is representative of the attraction and opportunities that cities held for the thousands of settlers who chose not to make their living from the land.

101 Ranch Historic District

Location: Ponca City, Kay County

Relevant issues: African American history, cultural history

Statement of significance: This large cattle ranch was the home base of the 101 Wild West Show, which toured from 1904 to 1916 and again from 1925 to 1931. The show featured Bill Pickett, the well-known African American cowboy who invented steer wrestling and was elected to the Cowboy Hall of Fame.

Sequoyah’s Cabin

Location: Akins, Sequoyah County

Relevant issues: American Indian history, education, literary history

Statement of significance: This frontier house of logs was occupied (1829-1843) by Sequoyah (c. 1770-1843), the teacher who in 1821 invented a syllabary which made it possible to write and read the Cherokee language. The giant California sequoia trees are named for him.

Washita Battlefield

Location: Cheyenne, Roger Mills County

Relevant issues: American Indian history, military history

Statement of significance: This was the scene of an 1868 attack by George Armstrong Custer’s troops on the village of Black Kettle, peace chief of the southern Cheyenne. It demonstrated the effectiveness of winter campaigns against Southern Plains Indian groups.

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